Facebook Supports Tor Project For .Onion Sites To Get Official Recognition

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This move may have been to help expand into various markets including China, which currently blocks Facebook based on IP addresses.

In an age where we are getting more and more concerned (or at least should be getting more and more concerned) about Internet privacy, Tor has been like a shining beacon of hope for those that want net neutrality.

.Onion sites on the dark web are only accessible via Tor-enabled services, and were previously only internally defined, going undefined within the greater context of the internet.

Your TOR usage is being watched

.Onion sites have now gone legitimate, with the domain registered officially with the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

This opens up a new world of opportunity for greater security and more widespread use of the dark web.

What is Tor?

Tor is a free browser that protects users against others monitoring their Internet traffic. The service allows Tor servers located across the world to mask users IPs from snoops. When used with the Tails live-boot system and several other anonymity measures, Tor gives the best anonymity cloak for your browsing.

The service allows Tor servers located across the world to mask users IPs from snoops.

When used with the Tails live-boot system and several other anonymity measures, Tor gives the best anonymity cloak for your browsing.

When used with the Tails live-boot system and several other anonymity measures, Tor gives the best anonymity cloak for your browsing.

The Tor browser has been both praised and criticized.

On the one hand, Tor offers security from persecution in dangerous countries, and from government whistleblowers.

The freedom that a network is supposed to promote is available via Tor.

From a critic’s point of view, Tor may also offer protection from criminals on the dark web via .onion sites, in distributing illegal drugs and weapons, and harboring meeting places for criminal activities.

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What Are .Onion Sites?

.Onion sites are dark web locations with the .onion (instead of .com, .net, etc.) suffix.

These sites are only accessible via the Tor browser and so are not able to be reached by traditional Internet browsing services like Firefox and Chrome browsers.

.Onion website addresses are made from hashes based on a server’s public key, and so may not be human-readable.

This is to protect both the server and the client from being able to determine each other’s locations.

What’s This About Official Recognition?

As of September, 2015, .onion sites are now officially recognized by both the IETF and the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).

Previously, .onion was only a pseudo-domain, which lacked formal specification.

.Onion sites are now classified as a “Special Use Domain” (SUD), along with other SUDs such as .local and .test, making the .onion suffix unavailable to claim via a new registration with the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN).

This new definition allows .onion site administrators to be able to obtain traditional Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and Transport Security Layer (TLS) certificates ensuring the authenticity of their particular site.

This new definition gives legitimacy to .onion sites as well as improved security measures for both hosts and clients.

Why Is Facebook Involved?

In an age where we are getting more and more concerned (or at least should be getting more and more concerned) about Internet privacy

The .onion recognition only came about due to an Internet Draft proposal to the IETF by Tor’s Jacob Appelbaum and Facebook’s Alec Muffett.

The two collaborated on the piece that outlined the expected behavior of .onion sites, including the inability to access .onion sites from the Clearnet.

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For Appelbaum, you can see why he’d be interested in the recognition, but why was it important for Facebook?

As a traceable website on the Clearnet, Facebook was determined to have a secure presence on the dark web, allowing people to log in without others seeing their activity.

This move may have been to help expand into various markets including China, which currently blocks Facebook based on IP addresses.

This new Facebook service was launched in October 2014, and relied on an SSL connection.

The SSL certificate for the dark web Facebook site was obtained by a loophole in the way that security certificates were issued.

This loophole was set to close on November 1st, 2015, and so Facebook was interested in making .onion sites legitimate in order to allow for security certificates to be easily obtained.

How Can I Browse Facebook Using Tor?

If you have the Tor browser installed and are up to date with the latest updates, you can simply fire it up and head over to https://facebookcorewwwi.onion/ .

If not, go to the Tor website and download the Tor browser to start using the service.

For increased security, download Tails, the bootable operating system for use with Tor.

Using this method to access Facebook ensures end to end encryption without the data being able to be tracked or your IP address logged.

If you are after the most secure method of using Facebook, then this is the best way to access it.

Remember that Facebook still has all your personal details so will know who you are when you log in, unless you’ve registered with a pseudonym.

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The articles and content found on Dark Web News are for general information purposes only and are not intended to solicit illegal activity or constitute legal advice. Using drugs is harmful to your health and can cause serious problems including death and imprisonment, and any treatment should not be undertaken without medical supervision.

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