Ahead of Midterms, US Senate Candidate Voices Support for Ross Ulbricht’s Freedom

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U.S. Senate candidate Eric Brakey said he would urge President Trump to grant Ross Ulbricht pardon if elected.

The movement to exonerate Ross Ulbricht, the currently incarcerated founder of Silk Road, has received a boost from a U.S.Senate candidate just weeks ahead of the midterm elections.

Maine State Senator Eric Brakey, a Republican who is currently running for federal Senate office, signed Ulbricht’s clemency petition and voiced his support for the movement on Twitter.

Vocal Support from Senate Candidate

Ulbricht is currently serving a double life sentence along with a 40-year jail term without the possibility of parole for his role in establishing and leading the operations of Silk Road, a darknet market that was seized in 2013.

This past summer, the Supreme Court denied his Petition of Certiorari for alleged constitutional violations during investigations and his sentencing.

Essentially, the denial prohibits Ulbricht from appealing his sentencing again before the Supreme Court.

To further the quest for Ulbricht’s freedom, his family, legal team and supporters of the Free Ross campaign launched a petition on Change.org aimed at U.S. President Donald Trump.

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A few days after its launch, the petition had gunned over 18,400 signatures and has currently been signed by over 95,000 individuals.

The campaign received a major boost after State Senator Brakey, a Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate, signed the petition as well.

Through a post to his Twitter handle back in August, Brakey said that he had signed the petition.

In subsequent tweets posted a month later, Brakey expressed his wish to visit Ulbricht when he visits Colorado before stating that he had been treated unfairly by the criminal justice system.

He further stated he would raise the issue with president Trump if he wins the November midterm elections.

Ulbricht replied through his handle (dictated by his family) thanking the senator for his support and stating that he was his “new favorite Senate candidate.”

Ulbricht’s twitter handle was created earlier this year by his family and friends, to offer him a platforms relay thoughts and other sentiments concerning his clemency petition.

He stated in a tweet that he directs his tweets through phone and the comments are printed out and mailed to him.

Online petition on a web.
Through a post to his Twitter handle back in August, Brakey said that he had signed the petition.

He has also received support from Erik Voorhees, a key figure in the crypto world.

Additionally, the Libertarian Party of the United States during their convention passed a resolution urging president Trump to grant Ulbricht a full and unconditional pardon.

It has been exactly five years since Ulbricht was sentenced, and his quest for freedom has been riddled with obstacles.

Some have argued that the chances of freedom have become slim to none after the Supreme Court blocked his most probable chance.

Furthermore, the severity of Ulbricht’s sentencing has been questioned by many, stating that it violated his Fourth and Sixth Amendment rights.

Through their website, the Free Ross campaign has outlined information and proof that injustice imposed on Ulbricht.

They seek to raise awareness of the allegations of rights violations, reliance on unproven allegations, corruption and prosecutorial misconduct during investigations and trial.

Regardless of the misfortunes in Ulbricht’s pursuit for freedom, there might be light at the end of the tunnel after all.

This was after a court in New York dropped the murder-for-hire indictment against him. This indictment was a key point during his sentencing, with his family and friends optimistic that it dismal will open up a glimmer of hope for his freedom.

All in all, Ulbricht could have a powerful voice in Eric Brakey in his quest for freedom if he is elected into the federal U.S. Senate.

C.M.

C.M.

With the urge to know more about everything around us, I am an enthusiast researcher and writer with keen interest in expanding my knowledge in a bid to be well versed. Through writing, I express and share my feelings, ideas, and thoughts for like minded individuals.
C.M.
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1 COMMENT

  1. Anonymous

    My thoughts on this is that he was probably convicted because he is white and cut into the profit of the wrong people. There are some in the world that do violent crimes and get away with it because they have relatives in India and close by. They also lie to police, violently attack people because they feel like it injuring their victims for life, threaten their employees lives with a firearm, also involve themselves in child pornography, sexual abuse of others and promote it among others at the place that they work and also hire people that due to military contracts are not allowed to see or work on the projects because they are citizens of countries that are enemies of the state, and he gets away with this and more because he owns a business. Yet guys like Ross William Ulbricht get all the people pulling all they can to get him locked up, and he has not done anything violent or threatened violence against anyone. What ever happened to the key things about the punishment fitting the crime? Ross did no more than paperwork violations, as all the things that he was convicted of are perfectly legal with proper paperwork with the DEA, and so forth. Ross did not personally harm anyone, yet he is in federal prison where my former boss belongs.

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